Ready Player One by Ernest Cline – Book Review

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline – Book Review

My taste in books has changed quite a lot over the years. It’s been teen dystopians like The Hunger Games and Divergent, crime thrillers, and even a period of lighthearted chick-lit. But at the moment, as well as contemporary YA, one of my favourite genres is futuristic sci-fi – especially if it includes virtual reality elements. That’s why I couldn’t wait to read Ready Player One by Ernest Cline.

Book cover - Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

It’s the year 2044, and the real world has become an ugly place. We’re out of oil. We’ve wrecked the climate. Famine, poverty, and disease are widespread.

Like most of humanity, Wade Watts escapes this depressing reality by spending his waking hours jacked into the OASIS, a sprawling virtual utopia where you can be anything you want to be, where you can live and play and fall in love on any of ten thousand planets. And like most of humanity, Wade is obsessed by the ultimate lottery ticket that lies concealed within this alternate reality: OASIS founder James Halliday, who dies with no heir, has promised that control of the OASIS – and his massive fortune – will go to the person who can solve the riddles he has left scattered throughout his creation.

For years, millions have struggled fruitlessly to attain this prize, knowing only that the riddles are based in the culture of the late twentieth century. And then Wade stumbles onto the key to the first puzzle.

Suddenly, he finds himself pitted against thousands of competitors in a desperate race to claim the ultimate prize, a chase that soon takes on terrifying real-world dimensions – and that will leave both Wade and his world profoundly changed.

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Cinema Snippets: Early Man & The Mercy

Cinema Snippets: Early Man & The Mercy

It’s time for another collection of Cinema Snippets, my snippet-length reviews of recent cinema releases! After this post I’ve finally caught up with all the films I’ve seen over the past couple of weeks, so I can go back to writing full posts again. Phew!

The Mercy and Early Man were both totally different films - one an intense biopic about a man's solo mission to sail the world, and the other a silly Aardman animation about a bronze age/stone age football match. Here are my reviews!

This time, I’m going to be sharing my thoughts on two very different films: The Mercy, a tense biopic starring Colin Firth and Rachel Weisz, and Early Man, a hilarious Aardman animated comedy starring Eddie Redmayne, Tom Hiddleston, and many others. (more…)

The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr – Book Review

The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr – Book Review

The One Memory of Flora Banks is another one of the books on my YALC reading list. I’ve been hearing about this book a lot on social media, and I’ve never picked up a copy myself. With Emily Barr attending YALC next month, it gave me a reason to read it!

The One Memory of Flora Banks is another one of the books on my YALC reading list. I’ve been hearing about this book a lot, so I finally reviewed it!

How do you know who to trust when you can’t even trust yourself?

Flora has amnesia.

She can’t remember anything day-to-day: the joke her friend made, the instructions her parents gave her, how old she is.

Then she kisses someone she shouldn’t – and the next day she remembers it.
It’s the first time she’s remembered anything since she was ten.

But the boy is gone.

I look at my hands. One of them says ‘FLORA be brave’

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Right Here Waiting for You by Rebecca Pugh – Book Review

Right Here Waiting for You by Rebecca Pugh – Book Review

Happy publication day to Right Here Waiting for You by Rebecca Pugh! I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of this book from NetGalley. I really enjoyed it, so here’s my review!

Happy publication day to Right Here Waiting for You by Rebecca Pugh! I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of this book from NetGalley.

Synopsis

We used to be best friends…

Magda used to be the girl everyone wanted to be – most likely to achieve her every wish. That is until suddenly her perfect life seems to be anything but!

Sophia has never regretted her life, sure it isn’t perfect, but being a single mum to a daughter she loves is pretty great. Perhaps she never moved away from home, or got to live out her dreams, but what she has right now isn’t so bad.

That is until an invitation to their school reunion arrives, throwing both their lives into a spin – because these two used to be friends and it might finally be time to face up to that one big mistake that happened all those years ago…

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The Light Fantastic by Sarah Combs – Review

The Light Fantastic by Sarah Combs – Review

Have you ever read a book that leaves you feeling completely confused, not even sure what’s going on, but you can’t stop reading? That was this book for me. I tried my best to formulate my thoughts into some kind of review…

Have you ever read a book that leaves you confused, but you can't stop reading? That's how I felt about The Light Fantastic by Sarah Combs.

Synopsis

Seven tightly interwoven narratives. Three harrowing hours. One fateful day that changes everything.

Delaware, the morning of April 19. Senior Skip Day, and April Donovan’s eighteenth birthday. Four days after the Boston Marathon bombing, the country is still reeling, and April’s rare memory condition has her recounting all the tragedies that have cursed her birth month. And just what was that mysterious gathering under the bleachers about?

Meanwhile, in Nebraska, Lincoln Evans struggles to pay attention in Honors English, distracted by the enigmatic presence of Laura Echols, capturer of his heart. His teacher tries to hold her class’s interest, but she can’t keep her mind off what Adrian George told her earlier.

Over in Idaho, Phoebe is having second thoughts about the Plan mere hours before the start of a cross-country ploy led by an Internet savant known as the Mastermind. Is all her heartache worth the cost of the Assassins’ machinations?

The Light Fantastic is a tense, shocking, and beautifully wrought exploration of the pain and pathos of a generation of teenagers on the brink—and the hope of moving from shame and isolation into the light of redemption.

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